Kitchen Countertop

January 31, 2016

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Beautiful beech from Wales full of character.

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After planing them all ‘ dead straight’ which is not an easy task with such long length 3.25 metre, I started gluing them with domino joints, one at the time so I could give it my full attention, I was very pleased with  the result.

astriddegroot

 

astriddegroot

The beautiful grain of the wood after a bit of sanding to 120 grit.

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I added a piece of cross wood to the end grain, that prevents the board from splitting, just better.

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Routing the opening for the Belfast sink.

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astriddegroot

Routing the drainage, I also cut a water drip under the drainage to stop water drips from staying under the countertop.

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I sanded the countertop back to 0000 steel wool in the end, added 6 layers of finishing oil with in between  smoothly going with steel wool with the direction of the grain. I applied 2 coats of boat lacquer on the underside.

astriddegroot

astriddegroot

Kitchen countertop

September 29, 2013

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Spalted beech for countertop, can’t wait to see what I have here.

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The counter top finish is 4 times finishing oil followed by wax. At this point cabinets and countertop fitted, still need to fit the doors and the back-splash.

Kitchen cabinet doors

September 29, 2013

DSC04946Welsh oak for the doors, the battens are inlay dovetail-shaped

DSC04953And flush with the door.

DSC04957Gluing the battens.

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DSC04996Template for routing.

DSC05031I always like to make my own grips knobs or pulls these are made from the same oak as the doors.

DSC05110Finished doors

 

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Finished door.

DSC05285Little turned pull I used beech,  top cabinet door.

 astriddegrootAsh paneled door untreated.

astriddegroot

astriddegrootGlass doors and corner-cabinet door for top kitchen cabinets, ash.

astriddegrootOak under-sink cabinet with panelled door, rounded corners, hand-made pull and a little latch.

Drainage board

May 29, 2012

Drainage board for a cute little cottage, I had a plank of beautiful Welsh native elm just enough to make this drainage board, not much waist optimal use of the wood. After planing, squaring and sawing I glued it together with lamello’s (biscuits) in between.

With the router and template under an angle, I cutted out these drainage slots.

I filled the cracks with sawdust mixed in glue.

And sand it all to a very fine grit, the last one with 800 grit and terpentine.

Laquer on the underside, lots of layers of finishing oil on the top surface.

It’s installed here, I made a little waterdrip under the front edge of the board to stop water traveling under the board in the cupboard. I did the test and it seems to work well.

Counter top

April 29, 2012

This reclaimed afromosia was saved from a laboratory, it was glued together but we had to take it apart, square it plane it and glue it back together with biscuits in between.

Vetilation gaps in the back, the walls are damp so some airflow will prevent it from getting mouldy.

keys for bolts to connect one counterpart to another

Delicate point after cutting out the space for the sink.

Kitchen cabinets

March 20, 2012

Kitchen cabinets we build them out of birch plywood exterior put together with biscuit joints, here in two layers of undercoat, they will be painted with eggshell.

Ash for the panel doors.

Took out the old kitchen, changed water and electric, treat the wall, make it ready for the new kitchen .

Started to put in the new cabinets.

We didn’t use wood for the counter top because this is a holiday cottage, but I think we could.

Position the sink and the hob for cut out.

Last finishes

And done!

Plate rack

March 4, 2012

My idea for making a plate rack was to make it as simple as possible in design and it had to be very practicle in use. For the top shelf I made sliding dovetails, the strongest joint you can have for shelfs for the rest mortise and tenon joints, the two back plates are slotted in glued and screwed.

Find out where support is needed

Check  the plates won’t fall out

Drill the square holes for the sticks with the mortiser, through two supports in one go.

The ash is very flexible it won’t break easy, still I made sure that the sticks can be replaced

To hang the plate rack on the thin wooden wall I used metal wall plates, two on the plate rack two on the wall , first I screwed a board of the same ash on the other side of the wall for use as a coat hanger, but more important I could use longer screws to secure the plate rack on to the wall.

I left  the handcarved pegs of for a while to let them acclimatize in this kitchen space to shrink , I made them out of green hawthorn.

All finished and oiled

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